Leopard's Bane Daisy

Leopard's Bane (Doronicum spp.) is a curious sight in the springtime garden. We tend to think of yellow daisies as a summer and fall plant, and they seem out-of-place among Bergenia, Aquilegia, and late tulips. That being so, they are welcome and cheerful sight when spring days are dull and rainy.

They are not fussy as to soil, just moisture retentive, but well draining, a nice mix of sand and humus suits them fine. Even though they mostly go dormant during the summer, they should not be allowed to dry out, and if planted in light dappled shade that should not be a problem.

They will naturalize in a woodland garden, and several of the named varieties do come true from seed. The rhizomes can be divided in early fall to share or replant. In fact, they improve if divided every four years or so. The blooms also last well when cut for the table.

Flowers come as single or double daisy forms, in various shades of yellow. Dwarf forms, such as 'Gold Dwarf' at only 10 inches tall, tend to bloom earlier in April. Blossoming then progresses through the doubles, such as 'Spring Beauty' and 'Gerhard', to some of the large flowered ones like 'Miss Mason' and 'Harpur Crewe' which bloom into June, and stand to 2 feet tall.

The heart-shaped basal leaves are a nice shade of soft green that contrasts well with dark rhododendron leaves, and if planted among Hostas, Astilbes, or Campanulas, their foliage will fill in spaces for the summer months.

Aren't we so lucky to have so many choices of undemanding plants that can fill gardens with color and beauty, and we hardly have to lift a finger to make them thrive?

Happy planting!

 
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